Subsection 4.2.2.1.
The discharging of industrial waste water not containing hazardous substances into ordinary surface waters [...]

Article 4.2.2.1.1.

The general conditions for discharges into ordinary surface waters and/or for discharges of industrial waste water containing no hazardous substances in the outlying area to be individually optimised are as follows:

1

if the industrial waste water to be discharged contains such a quantity of pathogenic germs that the receiving water might become dangerously polluted as a result of the discharge, the waste water must first be disinfected;

2

the pH value of the discharged industrial waste water may not be over 9 or below 6.5; if the discharged industrial waste water originates from the use of ordinary surface water and/or groundwater and if the natural pH value of this surface water and/or groundwater is over 9 or below 6.5, one may use this natural pH value for determining the limit values for the pH of the discharge;

3

the biochemical oxygen demand in five days at 20C in the industrial waste water discharged may not exceed 25 mg oxygen demand per litre;

4

the temperature of the industrial waste water discharged may not exceed 30C; if it is explicitly stated in the licence and with an outside temperature of 25C or more, or if the cooling water is taken in at a temperature of 20C or more, the waste water discharged may have a temperature of up to 35C insofar as this does not cause the temperature of the receiving surface water to exceed the value indicated in the environmental quality standards;

5

in the industrial waste water discharged, the following concentrations may not be exceeded:

a)

0.5 millilitres per litre for settlable solids (during stationary sedimentation for two hours);

b)

60 milligrams per litre for suspended solids;

c)

5 milligrams per litre for perchloroethylene-extractable apolar substances;

d)

3 milligrams per litre for the sum of anionic, non-ionic and cationic surface-active agents;

6

if the industrial waste water discharged originates from the use of ordinary surface water and/or groundwater, the values set down in sub 3 and sub 5 of the present Article may be increased by the concentration value in the water taken in;

7

a representative sample of the industrial waste water discharged must not contain oils, fats or other floating substances in such quantities that the presence of a floating film can be established unequivocally; when in doubt, the presence of the film can be established by pouring the sample into a separating funnel to examine whether the two phases can be separated.